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The Course of Human Events

Audiobook

FROM THE #1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLING

AUTHOR OF JOHN ADAMS

On May 15th, 2003 David McCullough presented The Course of Human Events as The 2003 Jefferson Lecture in the Humanities in Washington, DC. The Jefferson Lecture is a tribute to McCullough's lifetime investigation of history.

In this short speech, this master historian tracks his fascination with all things historical to his early days in Pittsburgh where he "learned to love history by way of books" in bookshops and at the local library.

McCullough eloquently leads us through the founding fathers' attraction to history, letting us in on his composition of 1776 as well as the Pulitzer Prize winning John Adams. His obvious affection for history is inspiring, because it encompasses the whole reach of the human drama. In McCullough's able hands, history truly "is a larger way of looking at life."


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Publisher: Simon & Schuster Audio Edition: Unabridged

OverDrive Listen audiobook

  • ISBN: 9780743595667
  • File size: 18273 KB
  • Release date: May 24, 2005
  • Duration: 00:38:04

MP3 audiobook

  • ISBN: 9780743595667
  • File size: 18277 KB
  • Release date: May 24, 2005
  • Duration: 00:38:04
  • Number of parts: 1

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Formats

OverDrive Listen audiobook
MP3 audiobook

subjects

History Nonfiction

Languages

English

FROM THE #1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLING

AUTHOR OF JOHN ADAMS

On May 15th, 2003 David McCullough presented The Course of Human Events as The 2003 Jefferson Lecture in the Humanities in Washington, DC. The Jefferson Lecture is a tribute to McCullough's lifetime investigation of history.

In this short speech, this master historian tracks his fascination with all things historical to his early days in Pittsburgh where he "learned to love history by way of books" in bookshops and at the local library.

McCullough eloquently leads us through the founding fathers' attraction to history, letting us in on his composition of 1776 as well as the Pulitzer Prize winning John Adams. His obvious affection for history is inspiring, because it encompasses the whole reach of the human drama. In McCullough's able hands, history truly "is a larger way of looking at life."


Expand title description text